Criminal Rehab: Is It Worth the Risk?

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IS There Really REHAB for the CRIMINAL MIND? I mean, part of me wants to believe that you can grow and be different even if you have done some very terrible things in the past. However, I also see the point of view that you shouldn't be walking back onto the street when you're the type of person that literally has nothing better to do but to harm other people.

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Ron Lach

I suppose much depends upon the individual and the situation. So if we're talking about murder, some barbaric random act of violence, a fraud case where someone got really greedy with money, that that's not in those cases, it's a lot different. People break the law for a variety of reasons some out of desperation others for mental issues, addictions, or outside influences. Naturally, a few criminals are simply bad folks and operate with little regard for moral qualms.

For the ones who did show remorse and seemed to genuinely regret their actions, I think rehabilitation could be possible with the right programs and chances. Imagine someone who made poor choices as a teen due to their environment, but as an adult they realize how wrong it was. If they went to counseling, took classes, and showed they turned their life around over years in prison, I could see giving them an opportunity. Maybe they get released on very strict parole at first to ensure they're not backsliding.

Sitting here with my Pc writing this, I can say easily that rehab could work for "non-violent" criminals. However, I imagine many victims' families would argue that such human loss like fraud or anything or financial crimes is one that violate people's lives. Therefore, even for the offense that didn't cause physical harm, the consequence can be very damaging emotionally and financially. I am not trying to make light of how truly hard those things are.

For the most extreme cases though, like premeditated murder or serial killers and rapists, I have a very hard time believing they could ever be rehabilitated to re-enter society safely. It seems terribly risky to think therapy and programs would be enough to undo that level of violence and lack of human empathy. Those individuals seem too disturbed to ever trust again. Perhaps that is prejudicial or close-minded, but I am sure I would not wish to be the one who grants them another opportunity if later they continue to harm other persons.

As for the question of where one must draw the line, it is crucial to do so individually for each case. There's no perfect answer that fits every criminal. Maybe have professionals evaluate each situation individually - their crime, prison behavior, potential rehab progress, and risk factors for re-offending. The most severe cases get denied, but others get opportunities to prove themselves with very strict and closely monitored release conditions.

I know the court and prison system definitely isn't perfect at this currently. Having a better rehabilitation system in place could be great, but it would likely require a lot of resources, money, and qualified staff for education, job training, mental health support, and really focusing on addressing root issues beyond just punishing. A huge challenge is also giving reformed criminals true options to build a life after prison instead of going back to old environments that enabled crime.

It's definitely a complex issue and I can see good arguments on both sides. Spending tons of money to imprison people for decades seems like an imperfect system too. But there have also been too many cases of released criminals going on to commit more awful crimes no matter what their history. So it always comes with risks if we get rehabilitation assessments wrong. Those are just my thoughts based on how I currently see it, but I'm definitely open to learning more about better solutions as well. It's a tough line to determine how to balance justice, public safety, human reformation, and fiscal realities of incarceration.

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5 comments
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Indeed every adult is responsible for their decisions, change is a personal thing and if not personally taken, can never be forced or persuaded to

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This is a sensitive topic, but ain my opinion, not every criminal should be rehabilitated. There are those that seem to have evil ingrained in their DNA, if not they would not have been cruelly terrorising fellow humans. Such should not even be considered for rehabilitation at all. My thoughts though...
#dreemerforlife

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I think about sending a violent person to rehab

It’s not even about the person but what if he goes to hurt the workers?

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When I saw the topic from dreemport, I smiled because I knew the person went back to past to bring it😅*


Did you say if the criminals showed remorse?
We can fake real remorsefulness you know 😅

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